Contraceptives’ Effects on Sexual Experiences Play a Huge Role in Satisfaction, Study Finds

Sexual acceptability – how birth control methods affect users’ sexual well-being – is likely an important component of contraceptive satisfaction, but hasn’t been systematically examined until now. Dissatisfaction with a contraceptive method leads many people …

New Brief: Wisconsin’s Proposed Changes to Reproductive Health Funding

NEW CORE BRIEF: What would happen if reproductive healthcare providers were unable to participate in the Wisconsin Medicaid program? Members of the Wisconsin state legislature recently passed new legislation that would prohibit healthcare organizations that …

Rural Wisconsin Women Expect Local Hospitals to Offer Full Range of Reproductive Services, Study Shows—But Many Catholic Hospitals Limit Patients’ Options

New CORE research, led by Dr. Renee D. Kramer and colleagues, sheds light on Wisconsin women’s expectations about whether they can access a range of reproductive healthcare options at a Catholic hospital—and whether those expectations …

Dr. Leigh Senderowicz and a global team of researchers publish new paper in BMJ Global Health on person-centered reproductive care

Congratulations to Dr. Leigh Senderowicz, mixed methods reproductive health and demography researcher and Director of our CORE Lab group. Dr. Senderowicz has just published a new paper in BMJ Global Health, leading an international team …

When It Comes to Contraceptive Use, Sexual Impacts Matter: CORE Director Jenny Higgins and Colleagues Publish New Study in JAMA Internal Medicine

This week CORE Director Jenny Higgins and colleagues published a new article in JAMA Internal Medicine, titled “Association Between Patients’ Perceptions of the Sexual Acceptability of Contraceptive Methods and Continued Use Over Time.” “Our study shows that people’s sexual experiences of their contraceptive method seem to matter a lot in whether people like their method and use it over time. It’s important that we pay more attention to sexual acceptability in our contraceptive research, clinical care, and education,” Dr. Higgins said.